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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My first time on the forum, and looking forward to some expert advice on one point, please?

I am considering buying a 2008 TransalpXL700 which needs some TLC reflected in the price wanted. It has a centre stand which I would find very useful for parking at home, the bike on the side stand taking up too much space.
I am 70 (I hasten to add, not that feeble) and have managed every bike over the last 50 years in getting them on the centre stand....except this one! I know the technique of using body weight and smooth actions, also standing on the lever attached to the stand....and strong soled boots.
The decision to buy is muddied by this problem.
The original owner obviously never used the stand as it is covered in crud and difficult to push down, but the problem is trying to swing the bike over the vertical position of the stand.
The dealer himself had difficulties and he is a lot younger and stronger than I am.

Possible solutions for your consideration....
...use a piece of wood to back the rear wheel onto, thereby allowing the stand to get 'more vertical' before the final heave.
...remove the stand, cut an inch or so off the legs and re-weld the 'feet' on, so that the lift isn't quite so high.
...use a paddock stand for parking, a problem being I live by myself and have so one to assist in holding the bike.
...a method I haven't thought of.
...look for another bike!

When the dealer managed the stand I realised there was about 3" space under the rear wheel, and to use the stand you have to lift the bike so the swing arm drops before actually getting the weight over the vertical....something I am unable to achieve. By my reckoning if 1'5" is cut off the legs of the stand, the rear wheel will just about be touching the ground and the bike will be stable for storage.
If all else fails, then a lighter compromise bike will have to do, but before I hang my boots I'd like to try this style of bike, having had cruisers, Pans, sports, scooters....the Transalp is very comfortable to ride, I can get my feet on the ground, and I like the engine.

Your advice would be appreciated, please so that I can make up my mind asap.

Take care on the roads Driftwood.
 

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Generalissimo Tea Boy
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Africa Twin is the same. I never found it easy till I fitted pannier racks or frame guards at the rear and being able to use them to lift the bike over the 'hump' made it all much easier.
 

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I've had all 3 models of Transalp and it's a case of technique really. It helped me that I'm a fat git!

As you've already sussed, you need to step hard on the centrestand lug while lifting with the right hand and pulling aft with the left handlebar. Get some momentum backwards before you step on the lug and heave. I use right foot, the side stand needs to be down too, otherwise it gets in the way. If the bike you're looking at has been neglected in that area, a good lubeing will help.

There is the option of shortening the legs but if you do that you may be unable to effect rear wheel maintenance, esp out on the road.

To be honest I found the 700 an overweight over styled lump of a machine. It was lovely to ride once on the move, but a PITA to manoevre once stopped.

I first had a 600 for 20 years and regretted selling it, bought a 700 which I only put 1000miles on before getting rid of, I now have a 650 which has the same comfort as the 700, but still has the softer suspension of the 600. It's also easier than the 700 to get onto the stand. If you can find a 650 within your budget, that's the one I'd recommend.
 

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there is a knack to getting them on the centre stand but it is doable by anyone with average build.
I'm wondering if the bike has been lowered - this would make it much more difficult to get on the centre stand.....

Phil
 

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Hi there, I found it impossible to get my 700 on to the SW Motech centrestand. I am also 70. My solution was to get a proper centrestand from Piotr at WITOMOTO. One spring, fitted in 10 minutes and rolls on no problem. Fit and finish are brilliant as is his price. It came from Poland in a matter of days. Piotr (Peter) is a gentleman to deal with. I have a screen extender and an engine guard and the quality is there too. Tell him Les sent you! Cheers. Les
 

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Why don't you buy one of them bike stand / wheel chocks have a look on eBay, they are cheap and you ride or push the bike into them and let go, the bike stands upright on it own and is easy to store.
Just search on " motorcycle stand " they are made by "warrior"
Regards
 

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The 700 does need an extra bit of grunt to lift it on to the centrestand, but it soon becomes second nature. No point in buying a bike though if you're not comfortable with it - I've done that before and I bet you won't keep it. Having said that, it's a great all rounder and my favourite touring bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Many thanks for the rapid response to my question....amazed at how quickly you've all come back to help.

I like the solution of using a bike stand, which I must admit to not thinking about. It could also be used for security purposes if fixed to the concrete.

Yes, I always stand on the extension bar/tang/helper to aid the momentum, so I thought of extending the bar to give more leverage.

Also, clean up the centre stand so it moves freely....at present it doesn't spring back to the resting position due to muck and bullets, testament to how often it has been used by the previous owner. Here I am, thinking he may be younger and fitter, and didn't use the stand for the same reasons!! Makes me feel better already!

I have been offered the suggestion of using builders levelling (think they are called RV levellers) blocks to raise the rear wheel....just run the wheel onto the blocks to raise the bike a inch or so, and this will allow the stand to swing to a more vertical position without having to lift the bike. I do this with my 650 Burgman which is a lot heavier than the Transalp (they don't call them Lardies for nothing), having a rise in the concrete drive that stops rain getting into the workshop. I could use 1" timber stacked to form a small ramp.

I had thought of the earlier models, but they are pretty hard to come by, and because I'm getting a 'condition-discount' thought I'd take the opportunity to buy, spend a few weeks in the workshop working on it (a winter job, coffee close by, heater on, phone off :) ), and get to know the bike from hands on work.

I'll also look at WITOMOTO, thanks Les for the suggestion.

Being lighter than the 650 Burgman (C of G higher, though), it may be more manageable, and I do like bigger wheels and a tank betwix knees. I'll have another look at the bike, take it for an hour's ride and decide....well, decision really already made as I like the machine, and want to move on the scooter.

Thanks for all your help. In a funny way it is nice to know I'm not the only one who experiences trouble. Thought I was getting too old and feeble (perish the thought).
Once the bike is here I intend to fix a box on the back for my new little dog, so will be back to get ideas as and when. First I have to convince him that bikes are not scary

Take care, and thanks again
DW
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks chunkolini. A very interesting idea using a handle lower down. That is something else I'll investigate once I've got the bike in a few weeks time. I'd like to fit pannier frames anyway as I have a set of nearly new leather bags from my days with a Kawasaki Drifter VN800.
Lots of ideas to mull over. Thanks.
Take care DW
 

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A handle would be easy to get made, any competent welder could knock one up for you quite quickly and mount it behind the pillion footrest mount.
On the Pan European there is a flip out handle, without it I reckon it would be impossible to use the stand.
It still needs plenty of grunt but is fairly easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Apologies Gaz4292 for not getting back to you....computer problems, been away, and been busy....Burgman 650, 2009 sold back to the dealer in exchange for a 400 model which has caused me nothing but trouble. Now selling that back along with a renovated Suzuki GN250 that kept me busy during last winter in exchange for the Transalp700. In fact, the dealer bought the big Burgman for himself as he'd always wanted to own one...he's a mate anyway, so I got a decent price.

The proposed Transalp will be with me in a few weeks, a 2008 model with 17k on the clock, in need of some TLC, so another period being spent in the workshop to tidy her up this winter. It'll give me the chance to change the centre stand to the Polish one when ordered and to get it ready for touring Wales and Midlands next year.
Had another spin on it this week to confirm that I'd like to buy, so now booked into the dealer's workshop for fork seals and service with a check over. Next big problem....what name shall I give to the bike? You can see I like to deal with the big matters;-)

Take care Driftwood.
 

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Let me give you a hand onto that centrestand, Doris.

Watch where you're putting your hands, Mr Driftwood!! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Let me give you a hand onto that centrestand, Doris.

Watch where you're putting your hands, Mr Driftwood!! :D
..............................................................................................................................

Like it! Doris it is, and she'll not mind where my hands go....I hope!
 

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Another salient point, I have Hepco & Becker pannier rails and find that using the top rail to lift the bike on to the centre stand is easier than using the rear plastic bit. (Too much polish?) LOL Guilty as charged M'lud ! Also, get your boot firmly on to the top of the bottom plate of the stand lug and press all of your weight on it. The rest is easy peasy. Enjoy your 'Alp. It will return your TLC with an easy to live with, enjoyable mount for years to come. Les
 

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I think the centrestand is one of those things on the Transalp 700 - I have good days with it and bad days with it. The good days, I get the bike on the stand without a second thought, on the bad days it takes me 3 or 5 goes before I finally get the bike aloft. There's no obvious reason when's a good day and when's a bad day - and there's no way I can tell in advance.

Certainly, getting the stand cleaned up and the pivots well greased will help you get the bike on the stand - when you've got the weight on the bike on the stand, any stiffness or friction will be multiplied several times over and make it even more difficult. Start with some penetrating oil to help break the stiffness of the pivots, and then, once you've got it moving a bit, you can work the stand and get some thicker oil into the pivots. Just working the centre stand up and down a bit when the bike is leant over on the side stand will give you enough movement to get some oil worked into the pivots.
 

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Hi guys,a month ago I installed the Heavyduties mainstand.All is ok,BUT I've found a very very cheap Honda genuine main stand and I'm tempted to change the Heavydutie's with the other one 🤣🤣🤣🤣

Does anyone use the genuine?
Is so difficult to use as the Heavyduties? 🤣
 
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