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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys,

i have a vague memory of someone here, using a traffic sign behind the plastic belly pan of the xl650v to toughen it up...can somebody give me some pointers where to find this gentleman?

I would love to do just that, but lack the skills necessary to do it myself, so of course i need to find someone who can?

thanks

R.
 

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I have used a piece of stiffish (2-3mm thick?) aluminium to line the 650 bash plate.
Works a treat, it wouldn't stand up to serious offroading but good enough to offer protect for most situations.

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
do you have any "patterns" or cutouts. How did you attach the lining to the bash plate? or did you just line up the screw holes?. sorry to be daft, but i am technically not capable at all...

R.
 

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Steve T here - he of old sign sump guard making imfammy!

I've done 3 so far including one for a 600 Alp that was just bent to follow the contours of the original plastic sump guard, then bolted outside the original plastic guard. I use blocks of wood, jam the sheet of alloy between them and apply a bending motion till I get the desired angle. The use uf a sizable plastic/rubber mallet helps things along no end as well :D. I have to admit that the one for the Alp is more of a skid plate with frontal protection for the engine. It doesn't have any raised side skirts to protect the side cases or water pump. The original does that job, cos it's still fitted under the alloy sheet.

The one on my F650 was made in the same fashion but it has completely replaced the plastic guard, leaving the engine side casings more exposed than they are with the plastic one fitted. I did this as on the F650, the engine sits well within the frame, with very little sticking out.

The one I've made for my F800GS is a little more "finished, in that it has a raised skirt on both sides and air flow vents in the front - the F8GS has it's oil cooler right on the front of the engine, where everything that's thrown up by the front wheel can hit it, hence the need for cooling vents.





Steve T

:cool:
 

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Hi Ben..

The xrv750 bash plate is basically a centre plate and 2 sides that attach underneath by bolts/nuts...you can use the std front [1] bolt and bolt hole beneath gear lever [remove side plastic plate] try german/France ebay...

The clutch side requires the removal of rear lower exhaust plate [sub chamber] ..mines had loads of hammer on the trails and regularly needs bashing back into shape with no damage to engine etc...

Have and collect as many pics as possible and find a suitable donor material [alloy] and ask your local welder/fabrication shop to knock you something up if your not happy with a hammer, just make sure it dosent catch the water hoses and horn...

steve T`s bmw 800 is best..just use some thick cardboard to form a template then unfold to cut out and form sides..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ahh...the master at last....

i get you. step one is to find a suitable material, maybe 3mm thick. then i need to get me some wood to use as a "lever" to start bending around till the shape is what i want it...simple in theory

one question. how do you punch holes in them to replicate the airflow in the original belly pan?

R.
 

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Hill Rider
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As Tramp says (I forgot to mention it in my previous post), use a piece of stiff cardboard to make a former / template in the shape & size that you want. I did this for the F8GS sump guard. By using the original sump guard mounting points as a fixed starting point, I cut, bent and stuck masking tape onto the card till I got what I wanted. Used that as a template onto the alloy plate (the stuff I use is a little under 3mm) then once cut out, started bending. To help stop the mounting bolts getting ripped off, I formed depressions in the alloy plate around the mounting point holes. The depressions were formed using a suitable sized socket under the plate, them walloping the plate with a ballpein hammer, forcing the alloy to follow the diameter of the socket underneath.
The vent holes were cut out using a jigsaw and finishing with a file, then tapping till they were bent outwards enough to allow good airflow. I had a Touratech Oil & Filter guard to use as a guide to get the slot sizes right.
The wood wasn't used as a lever! More like a straight edge for you to bend the alloy against. Check out how Lowflyer did it for his panniers on this thread . .

http://www.xrv.org.uk/forums/bodgers-corner/77419-ali-panniers.html

Steve T

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Great job Stevie! You keep getting them tidier looking into the bargain! :thumbright:
 
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