Honda XRV Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've just got back from escorting a group of journalists on a trek across the Andes in Salta Province, Argentina. We were on sections of the famously treacherous road 'La Cuarenta', detouring off onto dry riverbeds and through tight canyons. We were in 4x4's I'm afraid - it would have been fantastic country for trail bikes. The routes are tortuous and in places rise to 5000m which means you're driving higher than the summit of Mont Blanc and oxygen is very scarce.

A running joke in my vehicle was about my Transalp. Both french journalists were motoring correspondants covering bikes and cars and neither had a good word to say about the 'alp (BMW afficiandos). We would drive along through mud and dust, over tricky sections of rock and across rivers. Every time we came to a particularly tough obstacle, one of the journos would comment, "christ, you'd hesitate to try that even on a Transalp" and they'd collapse laughing. When we detoured round a verticle drop they'd point at the route and announce it was "for Transalp's only" and proceed to roll around the vehicle in mirth. Needless to say this went on for mile after mile.

At one point the convoy leader up ahead announced over the radio to be careful and slow down as there was a motorbike coming towards us. "Ah, yes, clearly a Transalp", says one. "No other bike could make it up here", "Yes, yes" says the other "the Transalp is synonymous with extreme adventure touring after all" etc. etc. Ha ha ha.....

So, when at S25' 29' 46 / W66'23'12, 2500M altitude and just north of Tocolome, the XL650 Transalp drove out of the dust cloud and stormed past us with 2 passengers and full luggage, my driver almost crashed the vehicle in stunned suprise.
 

·
aka Oxbone :)
Joined
·
1,514 Posts
I've just got back from escorting a group of journalists on a trek across the Andes in Salta Province, Argentina. We were on sections of the famously treacherous road 'La Cuarenta', detouring off onto dry riverbeds and through tight canyons. We were in 4x4's I'm afraid - it would have been fantastic country for trail bikes. The routes are tortuous and in places rise to 5000m which means you're driving higher than the summit of Mont Blanc and oxygen is very scarce.

A running joke in my vehicle was about my Transalp. Both french journalists were motoring correspondants covering bikes and cars and neither had a good word to say about the 'alp (BMW afficiandos). We would drive along through mud and dust, over tricky sections of rock and across rivers. Every time we came to a particularly tough obstacle, one of the journos would comment, "christ, you'd hesitate to try that even on a Transalp" and they'd collapse laughing. When we detoured round a verticle drop they'd point at the route and announce it was "for Transalp's only" and proceed to roll around the vehicle in mirth. Needless to say this went on for mile after mile.

At one point the convoy leader up ahead announced over the radio to be careful and slow down as there was a motorbike coming towards us. "Ah, yes, clearly a Transalp", says one. "No other bike could make it up here", "Yes, yes" says the other "the Transalp is synonymous with extreme adventure touring after all" etc. etc. Ha ha ha.....

So, when at S25' 29' 46 / W66'23'12, 2500M altitude and just north of Tocolome, the XL650 Transalp drove out of the dust cloud and stormed past us with 2 passengers and full luggage, my driver almost crashed the vehicle in stunned suprise.
What a crap job you have... heres me stuck in an office day after day while your having to put up with personal insults from your colleagues and jibes about your cycle preferences... I suggest we trade places,
Can you start tomorrow.... Now..... which way is Argentina? :D :D :D


Great story Rob.... with an even better ending :D
 

·
Golam Rosewater
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
What a cool story highlighting the understated ability of the 'Alp :thumbup:

Sorry Mudwiz, doesn't let you off - you ARE mad :D
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top