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Deer Dodger
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My eldest son has just had his bank account hacked for the 8th time in three weeks. each they are requesting emergency cash, know his security number etc. Every time he phones up fraud squad, he changes his security, they still are getting emergency cash out. The bank ( RBS ):mad: are absolutely useless in getting to the bottom of this. My son has had the embarrassment of having his card declined several times, not to mention direct debits not going through.


Any ideas legal eagles ?
I've told him to get the police involved and screw the bank for all he can get as he really is getting stressed out by it all but I'm not sure what the best course of action is ??

Any help would be appreciated, the [email protected] have take about £500 of him, he got it back from the bank, just a bloody mess
 

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John, this sounds a right mess and one that shouldn't happen.
If the bank have been informed, surely this should involve their fraud dept who inturn should notify the police, might be worth you/your son reporting it to the police anyway?

Maybe just open a new account & close that one down?

Phil

sent from my 'phone
 

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If he is changing his security and they know it when they request cash, they must be getting the details somehow. Maybe he has a keylogger trojan on the PC he uses for online banking...
 

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Deer Dodger
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys, well he phoned the police yesterday as suggested, hasn't heard anything back.:confused:

He's already changed his account but he can't change banks due to an outstanding loan ?? not sure about that one, but he's popping round later on, we'll have another look at things again.

cheers
 

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Grumpy auld man!
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he can't change banks due to an outstanding loan ??
Get yer bloody wallet oot and pay it for him, I am sure he will pay you back.:rolleyes::D


Andy.
 

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XRV750 RD04
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If he is changing his security and they know it when they request cash, they must be getting the details somehow. Maybe he has a keylogger trojan on the PC he uses for online banking...
That was my first thought too, and sometimes trojans won't be picked up by anti virus software. Running a scan on the computer with an anti-malware scanner in addition to the usual virus scan might help to pick up anything missed by your usual virus software (though none of them are perfect as it's a constantly growing arms race between the malware coders and those trying to stop them - free trials are available for most anti-malware software and some continue to be free after the trial period - albeit with reduced features). There are forums online where experts and enthusiasts can help him to identify suspect services running on his computer manually that might be worth checking out too if it's looking like the source of the problem might be the computer and you still can't find anything.

I'd try getting the bank to change passwords etc. at their end then don't use the computer for online banking if it can be avoided, until you're sure it's clean. Then if it happens again that might be an indicator that it's a problem at their end (though not a guarantee).

I'm not sure what the emergency funds thing is, but if it's not just online banking that has been hacked and they have his card and pin number, it's worth considering:

* Consider any ATMs he's using regularly to see if there's a pattern. Scammers will sometimes fit false fronts or cameras to ATM machines to get card and pin numbers when people use them. If it's just that they're spending on his card, its possible he's been issued with a new pin number then used the compromised ATM again and they're getting the numbers that way.

* Have a think about what shops he's been using the card in and see if there's any pattern. Maybe someone dodgy working in a shop collecting card numbers and using or selling them on (there's a market online for stolen credit card details so even if it's looking like the money is being spent at the other end of the country or abroad the source could still be local).

* If using particular computers in an internet cafe or outside the home regularly, check the keyboard wire to see if a keylogger has been installed. A small device that plugs between the keyboard wire and port on the computer can be installed in seconds, then collected later to see what people have been typing (the safest option is just not to do any online ordering or banking on any computer you don't own or know you can completely trust). Bear in mind that you can get adapters to use old keyboards with USB too, so don't kick up too much of a fuss if you see one of those. An adapter that converts from one type of connector to the same type of connector on the other end is more suspect.

* If connecting to wifi hotspots while out and about, particularly in busy places, make sure that he's not being caught out by a man in the middle attack (i.e. someone creating their own wifi hotspot on their laptop or a device somewhere nearby set up to look like the real wifi hotspot - then when people connect up to their hotspot by mistake they relay traffic between the real hotspot and the user, logging information in the process). There have been some bugs in the OpenSSL protocol discovered recently that might have compromised a number of websites, making this sort of attack more easy I'm guessing (I'm not quite sure - I doubt it's had any effect on the banks but it has with online stores and services where card details may be entered).

* If using wifi at home, make sure it's password protected using a modern security setting (not WEP), and consider changing the wifi passwords and using a strong password. While I'd imagine less likely than some of the above, it's possible for someone nearby to pick up wifi traffic and analyse it to extract info from it (I think it's even possible to do that with secured/encrypted traffic - though they'd need to collect a lot of data over a period of time and spend a long time trying to crack it unless your password is weak or a dictionary word for that to be possible - but if your wifi isn't secured with a password or is secured with WEP it will make things a lot easier for them).

* If he's accessing online banking or ordering things online using the card associated with that account, from a work computer, it might be worth letting their IT guys know so they can check things out to make sure there's nothing happening that shouldn't be on their computers or network.

Not really the legal advice you were looking for, but perhaps something there will be some help if you don't get much joy from the police (I know they have cyber crime units etc. now that specialise in this sort of thing and take it seriously, but I'm not sure how much use they'd be for small scale things - my guess would be that with finite budgets they're probably p*ssing in the sea trying to hold back the tide so would tend to focus on the bigger things - though I may be wrong).
 

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Wing Commander
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14,437 Posts
My eldest son has just had his bank account hacked for the 8th time in three weeks. each they are requesting emergency cash, know his security number etc. Every time he phones up fraud squad, he changes his security, they still are getting emergency cash out. The bank ( RBS ):mad: are absolutely useless in getting to the bottom of this. My son has had the embarrassment of having his card declined several times, not to mention direct debits not going through.


Any ideas legal eagles ?
I've told him to get the police involved and screw the bank for all he can get as he really is getting stressed out by it all but I'm not sure what the best course of action is ??

Any help would be appreciated, the [email protected] have take about £500 of him, he got it back from the bank, just a bloody mess
Can you get him to ring me? - 020 8694 9412. I'll write a story on AOL Money about this and get some advice on what to do if your banks is hacked.
 

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Some great advice & I hope it gets sorted soon.
My sister had her online account hacked despite (she said) never accessing it from any hot spot or public computer. When the bank investigated, her password had been tried 8 times before getting in. Someone transferred her savings & ISA (over 30k) to another bank account. My sister logged into her account just 3 hours after the money had been extracted but that didn't stop the money being withdrawn from a bank hundreds of miles away the next day.
She had to prove she didn't make the transfer! Fortunately she'd been in a meeting with several others at the time her account was hacked. It still took 4-6 weeks for the bank to restore her accounts & moved banks immediately.

Read about the Heartbleed virus it's affected millions & if you can, persuade your son to only do online banking on a secure network & ensure the anti-virus software is up to date.
 

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Deer Dodger
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You know, this site never ceases to amaze me, well done fellow XRV's. Many thanks to all who supplied sound advice, greatly appreciate you taking the time.
Whealie, you have a pm, I'll get my young fella to get in touch with you when I get back home at the weekend, yet again you have helped me out. Guess my beer tab is going to increase somewhat at the National !!

Thanks again guys !!!
 
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