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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just for my curiousity,what's the function of this bit, called a "silicon regulator"? everytime i see it, i always wonder. i thought it was some sort of fuse! if some one can answer then i could sleep better at night!
 

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It's a solid state voltage regulator that keeps voltage under a certain level (about 13.5v IIRC) to stop your battery frying and bulbs blowing. Basically it replaces the old tin can type of mechanical voltage regulator you used to get back in the day (I don't remember these myself of course, this is just what my dad told me :clown:). It will contain diodes as Lutin says, and in fact some of the cruder and older semi conductor based system just used to use a zener diode mounted on a large heat sink to dump excess voltage back to earth.
 

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It's a solid state voltage regulator that keeps voltage under a certain level (about 13.5v IIRC) to stop your battery frying and bulbs blowing. Basically it replaces the old tin can type of mechanical voltage regulator you used to get back in the day (I don't remember these myself of course, this is just what my dad told me :clown:). It will contain diodes as Lutin says, and in fact some of the cruder and older semi conductor based system just used to use a zener diode mounted on a large heat sink to dump excess voltage back to earth.
Sorry, but that is completely wrong in almost every respect. It is NOT a voltage regulator.

If you trace the wiring you will probably find that the diodes that this unit contains are part of the interlock system that prevents the starter motor from operating with the bike in gear unless the clutch is pulled.



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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all. After posting, i decided not to be lazy and do my own research. This is what i found.


Its only because i remove the seat i always see it and wonder. Again appreciate all the replies.
Mark

Ps. Its getting ferkin hot here. My handle bar grips have melted the glue and for a few minutes, i thought the carb was toast. I twisted the throttle and the revs wouldnt rise. Turns out the grip was spinning without the acutual twist grip. Relief.
 

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Ah, a rectifier is a different beast to a regulator. The rectifier turns the A/C (alternating current) output from the alternator into D/C (direct current) as used by the rest of the bikes electrical system.

Note to Lutin - I didn't really look too hard at the piccie, just went on the description 'Silicon Regulator'. My bad. Most bikes these days will have a combined regulator / rectifier any way.
 

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The rectifier does exactly what it says. It rectifies the AC output from your alternator(note name ALTERnator) to DC voltage which is what you bike uses, Older bikes(and I mean a lot older) used to have a magneto/dynamo which produced DC by virtue of it's design.
This does not regulate the voltage, for that a regulator is used. This can be done separately or built in as part of a rectifier module.
The heat sinks do not "dump excess voltage back to earth". I does exactly what it says, it's a heat sink. It is a cooling device for the electrical components that get hot as the deal with the excess current coming from the alternator.

Lutin. Sorry mate, but you are completely wrong.
 

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The rectifier does exactly what it says. It rectifies the AC output from your alternator(note name ALTERnator) to DC voltage which is what you bike uses, Older bikes(and I mean a lot older) used to have a magneto/dynamo which produced DC by virtue of it's design.
This does not regulate the voltage, for that a regulator is used. This can be done separately or built in as part of a rectifier module.
The heat sinks do not "dump excess voltage back to earth". I does exactly what it says, it's a heat sink. It is a cooling device for the electrical components that get hot as the deal with the excess current coming from the alternator.

Lutin. Sorry mate, but you are completely wrong.

Nope sorry, it is you that is wrong. This part (Honda part number 31700-196-000) is NOT used to rectify the output of the alternator. Yes, it contains diodes (also called rectifiers) but in this instance they are NOT used to rectify AC. Inside the casing are two diodes with common cathodes, so there are only three connections. Like this -


And, as I said earlier, these diodes are used in the starter interlock circuit to prevent the bike being started when in gear, unless the clutch is pulled in.

If this does not convince you, here's a the NX650 wiring diagram with the double diode pointed out -

Honda NX650 Wiring diagram - Diodes arrowed.jpg

And if you follow the wiring diagram you will find that these diodes are connected to the Neutral Switch (Interruttore folle) and the Clutch Switch (commutatore della frizione).



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And on top of all this bickering :D the advert is wrong. A rectifier does not allow the correct current from reaching battery, it allows the correct voltage type; DC
 

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If this does not convince you, here's a the NX650 wiring diagram with the double diode pointed out -
Nope, I'm convinced. That circuit takes me way back to my college days :- it's an OR gate. In this case it's OR'ing the neutral switch and clutch switch.
 

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Now you're just going to confuse people. :D
TBH I've been confused most of my life. I put it down to accidentally chatting up a transvestite at a party years ago. I was looking for a sweet dessert but nearly got meat and two veg instead. :silent::silent:
 

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OK - I'm going to add the full extent of my knowledge here, in 'real world' terms as I have recently replaced this on one of my own Africa Twins :D

When this part is not working - everything on the bike (all electrical components and circuitry) are working fine EXCEPT that the neutral indicator stays illuminated in all gears.

When this part is working - everything on the bike (all electrical components and circuitry) are working fine, and the neutral light now behaves as it should.

So - to sum up - this little doohickey (or Silicon Rectifier as Honda call it) is basically a light switch................ :thumbright::D:thumbright::D:D:D:D:D

caveat - please do not take this post as a serious attempt to explain electronics
 

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Well eff my tall hat. If you go by the description of the advert you could end up replacing something you don't need to. I cannot see why they would use this in the interlock circuit. Surely that would need a relay and I would expect the unit to have four connections. On my wiring diagram(1989 rd02) it shows only one diode and two connections. As has been pointed out the advert is wrong so it makes you suspect about the place selling the parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
so while everybody's sat back and comfortable, :thumbup: i have a question. would this diode/rectifier/regulator thingy have anything to do with my bike having an intermittent starting problem which i thought i'd solved. after a long run, so hot engine, its sometimes a bastard to start on the button, BUT it will bumpstart no problem. also it doesnt like starting with the side stand down in neutral, cold or hot. i thought i'd cured it before but it appeared again last week. i nearly changed the pulse generator last year but its been fine since so i didnt replace it although i think i might just bite the bullet. any ideas? cheers.
 
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