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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, I'm new here. I picked up a '99 AT in Dar es Salaam on the side of the road for 6000 USD back in 2007. It was a complete gamble but I've ridden the bike hassle-free for the last two-and-a-half years all over Tanzania. I LOVE IT.

She's been running great until recently. It started with some popping on the overrun and now after a couple klms the rear cylinder shuts down and it's put put put all the way home. I'm not a mechanic but I own tools and in this part of the world that makes me a mechanic.

After poking around in this forum it seemed like the choke was to blame. Sure enough, the rear plugs were black and sooty and when I pulled out the plunger on the rear it was stuck. I removed the cable and soaked it in WD40 til everything was moving nicely. Cleaned it all, put it back together, started it up, and... same thing only my knuckles were all banged up this time.

I probably own one of about 5 in the entire country (two of which are painted white and escort the President around town) so you guys are all I have! Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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The popping might be caused by air being sucked in where it shouldn't. Check all your airbox and carb inlets.
 

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skeptical old git
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I'm still going to say it's the choke!

Even if you're 100% certain the cable is OK and moves freely, it can still cause problems. The wee 90 degree bend on the end of the cable can cause problems too, and the spring can corrode and get weak.

Take the cable off completely. Clean the plunger up, grease it a bit, and pop it into the carb. The find a suitable bolt (or, you can use the small slot-head cap that covers the end of the brake pad retaining pins) and gently screw that in behind the plunger, pushing it right home. Change the spark plugs if they are really bad. Your bike should now run properly :p

Most of us find an AT will start up fine, provided your battery is OK, with no choke at all. Only an issue in sub-zero temperatures.
 

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diaphragm :icescream:
 

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It could be a dodgy CDI.
 

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The popping might be caused by air being sucked in where it shouldn't. Check all your airbox and carb inlets.
That would produce a lean run with the symptoms more prominent when cold. If the plugs are still sooty, it can't be an air leak.

Still worth checking as good practice: I had a split in the fuel tap vacuum pipe that made one cylinder pop a lot.

Spray WD40 on the air supply system (airbox and manifolds, but avoid spraying the actually air intake. If the revs falter look for an air leak in that vacinity.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone. This is a great community. Saturday morning I'm going to tackle this and I'll report back with some pics.

I definitely like the idea of blanking the choke. Seeing as I've never used it to get the bike started and it never drops below 23 centigrade here, I doubt it serves much purpose.

The vacuum system is a bit of a mystery to me and I wish I had a good workshop manual. There's a couple hoses that have never been connected to anything and I'm not sure what purpose they serve. One hangs down between the pots (from a T-connector on the port side) and another one sits in a little bracket just above and forward of the fuel tap (from a y-connector where the other side is joined to the fuel tank). :confused:

Any case, I'll keep hunting the web for answers and will let you know how it goes. In the meantime, I appreciate your ideas. Here's a pic of the plugs (DPR7EA9):

 

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those are your carb overflow pipes, its a funny system think it has to do with european fuel spilling regulations. also make sure they are unblocked, take them of from the bottom of the carbs and blow them out. you only really need the two going from the carb into the T, then down the back of your engine where the other drainpipes go. make sure they are not pinched somewhere, it could happen. i can send you some parts manuals and basic manuals if you like. mail me at [email protected]
are you in dar itself? want to take my @ over there some time this year....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
are you in dar itself? want to take my @ over there some time this year....
Yeah, just moved to Dar. I spent 3 years in Mbeya and 3 years in Musoma. I've ridden across the country twice. It's AMAZING! Come on down! Once spent 2 hours at the Ngorongoro gate on my AT trying to convince the guards to let me ride across the Serengeti! They told me I had to go around... took two days but it was the best ride I've ever had.

Here's a pic at the western gate (Ndabaka)...
 

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How dare you tell us it's at least 23c and there's no corrosion:D
I started my biking career in the 70s in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. No restrictions on where you rode and lots of desert. I think that's why I've always liked trail bikes.
It's interesting if it is a stuck choke, as you say you never use it, it shouldn't have moved!
Could the main jet have unscrewed? Don't knock it, my old Guzzi, the needle valve housing half unscrewed. It started beautifully, ran beautifully to 40MPH but would bog out. Everyting pointed to the normal culprits, but who'd have thought to check a loose needle valve:rolleyes:
Surely a split diaphragm would obvioulsy let less air in, but surely the needle wouldn't leave the main jet, so that pot would just run badly.
Check for a decent spark too.
 
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I'm betting on a bad CDI.

Swap the wires and the front cylinder should be affected and the rear should run just fine.

Just about the only real problem with the ATs (TAs, XRs and other models that use this type of ignition system).
 

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All of the above...BUT

The two sooty plugs indicate to me that it's the mixture as they are covered in soot. If it was the CDI I'd maybe expect them to be wet with fuel, and obviously there would be no spark, and no opportunity to run rich and coke up. That's not to say it isn't a wiring or CDI fault.

1. Choke? (you really need to check all 3 cables, splitter, springs and plungers) or blank off if you really don't use them.

2. Diaphragm? (You'll need to inspect it carefully, as they do damage easy, however I've never had RD07 carbs apart so can't advise)

3. CDI or Wiring? Do some basic electrical checks, check all the connectors are secure and clean, check you are getting a spark (by taking one lead off and grounding a spare spark plug to the frame) on both HT leads of that cylinder.

It'll be a really silly fault, AT's are generally pretty tough and fault free, so just start with the basics.


Nice places to ride you've got out there :thumbup:


Good Luck


Bob :thumb:
 

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Yeah, just moved to Dar. I spent 3 years in Mbeya and 3 years in Musoma. I've ridden across the country twice. It's AMAZING! Come on down! Once spent 2 hours at the Ngorongoro gate on my AT trying to convince the guards to let me ride across the Serengeti! They told me I had to go around... took two days but it was the best ride I've ever had.

Here's a pic at the western gate (Ndabaka)...
How about posting some more pics just to tantalize us:thumbright:

We'd get shot down in flames for riding a bike in T shirt & shorts!

Phil

Oh, as others have said, it is probably the chokes by the way.......
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the summary Bob... I've got this taped for tomorrow morning! Just have to find a bolt to blank off my choke... maybe I'll give me Landy a good kick and something will fall off??? :D

Tanzania is a great country. It's very peaceful and lots of varying geography to explore. Only problem with the AT is you get stopped at all the police checks because the cops have never seen a bike larger than a 125 here!

Danny
 

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We'd get shot down in flames for riding a bike in T shirt & shorts!
It's takes all I have to wear the helmet sometimes. :D Hot as heck here! But before you all start lecturing I just got a full Joe Rocket outfit from Canada. [sarcasm]Now I can slowly bleed out in the ditch instead of being killed instantaneously.[/sarcasm]
 

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just check your footing before kicking the landy. you might slip on the oil!:laughing6: if you block the chokes of (its a fine-thread bolt you need) be sure to locktite the buggers in, and assemble correctly with the little spring. mine vibrated loose, and one was stuck back in the wrong way round by some previous owner numnut (my brother).
tried sending you manuals etc but had no luck so far. any other fileshare sites you can suggest?
 

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Couldn't wait til tomorrow... again, I'm no mechanic but the diaphragm looks pristine to me. Please don't make me take it out!
 

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For blocking the chokes, as a temporary measure, you could use two of the slotted caps that cover the brake pad retaining bolts (if you have them on an RD07a)

Remember you need to leave the plunger and spring in behind the blanking plugs.


These...


 

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skeptical old git
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The quickest and easiest way to blank off the choke is to use the little plastic nut from the end of the choke cable. This also make it far easier to use the spring (as the nut has a hole that keeps it in place). The problem is it won't seal the hole, as the nut is hollow (obviously -- it used to have the cable running through it). A blob of grease or silicon sealant would sort that out.

Obviously a bolt that fits (maybe with a hole dilled in the end to accommodate the spring??) is a better long term answer. But using the plastic nut is quick and simple and you already have them, so it's the fastest way of confirming what your problem is.

The easiest way to get these off without breaking them is to cut the choke cable, and remove the outer sleeve (incl. the 90 degree bend at the end). Then you can get an 8mm (or 10mm? I forget...) socket on to them.

Don't discard the bits that go onto the end of the cable (90 degree bend; rubber sleeve that goes over it) as these can only be bought as a kit along with the plunger and spring. Costs about £40 ($60) per side. The choke cable costs the same if you ever need to replace it, but you can get a pattern one for about a quarter of that price which works just as well (i.e. equally badly).
 
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